COVID-19 took away movie theaters and threatens our most challenging films

Challenging films such as "I Was at Home, But ... " with Maren Eggert, center, are endangered by the pandemic. <span class="copyright">(Cinema Guild)</span>
Challenging films such as “I Was at Home, But … ” with Maren Eggert, center, are endangered by the pandemic. (Cinema Guild)

Save our cinemas

Thank you to Justin Chang for his moving and heartfelt article about seeing poignant movies on the big screen [“Cinematic Power Outage,” July 26]. My family has been in business for 90 years (Metropolitan Theaters). We think there is enough quality content for all mediums but the theatrical experience has to be preserved and nourished.

See it on the big screen surrounded by other people even at a distance.

Bruce Corwin

Los Angeles

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Justin Chang’s valuable discussion of the ways in which international cinema will be affected by the shuttering of movie theaters brings to mind another important absence that cinephiles are experiencing in the time of COVID-19: screenings of silent films with live musical accompaniment. Live music brings the cinematic past

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Burberry Foundation Brings Artists in Yorkshire, New York Together Amid Lockdown

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LONDON – The Burberry Foundation has expanded its in-school arts and culture project, Burberry Inspire, to the U.S. amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Artistic partners taking part in the program, such as American Ballet Theatre, Northern Ballet, Reel Works, Leeds Young Film, Studio in a School NYC, The Hepworth Wakefield and Leeds Playhouse, turned to virtual learning to continue their lessons, despite the impact of the pandemic on education programs.

Artists from those institutions created virtual dance, sculpture and digital media artworks that were directly inspired by the students, with highlights including the first-ever collaboration between American Ballet Theatre and Northern Ballet. Students worked with professional dancers on four films that were shot partly in New York and at the Hepworth Wakefield, a cubical-looking contemporary art museum in West Yorkshire, England.

Leanne Kirkham, director of learning at Northern Ballet, said: “With great challenge

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What are the origins of cathedrals and chapels?

<span class="caption">Mosaic in San Vitale Basilica, Ravenna, Italy</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/byzantine-mosaic-in-san-vitale-basilica-ravenna-royalty-free-image/175522853?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nimu1956/Collection E+ via Getty images">nimu1956/Collection E+ via Getty images</a></span>
Mosaic in San Vitale Basilica, Ravenna, Italy nimu1956/Collection E+ via Getty images

Cathedrals and chapels have played vital roles in the development of Christian culture.

As a scholar of the Bible, Judaism and Christianity, I have come to learn the historic importance of these structures and the pivotal role they play in the practice of many Christians’ faith.

Early Christian architecture

Cathedrals and chapels not only provide a space for worship, but they are also vessels for the display of religious iconography and art.

Until the early fourth century A.D., much of early Christian art and space for worship occurred in catacombs – subterranean locations where Christians would bury members of their community.

It has traditionally been thought that Christians used such catacombs due to persecutions by the Roman government. However, such persecutions were periodic and not sustained. Other explanations have been offered regarding the regular use of the

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This Netflix Film Eerily Predicted a Real-Life Political Assassination

Netflix
Netflix

“Truth is the most important thing,” says Tomasz (Maciej Musiałowski) midway through The Hater, and of all the falsehoods this habitual liar spews, none is more shameless. Still, while deception is Tomasz’s stock-in-trade, there’s plenty of authenticity to be found in writer/director Jan Komasa’s Netflix feature (premiering July 29), whose release was temporarily delayed because its fictional story wound up echoing a real-life tragedy that shook Komasa’s native Poland.

Three weeks after filming wrapped on The Hater, liberal Gdańsk mayor Paweł Adamowicz was assassinated on stage at a Christmas charity event by a right-wing hatemonger—a shocking crime that eerily echoes the plot of Komasa’s latest, which builds to a similar massacre involving a left-leaning homosexual politician who, by total coincidence, is also named Paweł. That campaigning candidate is not, however, the material’s protagonist; instead, the focus is squarely on Tomasz, a twentysomething student introduced being kicked out

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