Art & Entertainments

What are the origins of cathedrals and chapels?

<span class="caption">Mosaic in San Vitale Basilica, Ravenna, Italy</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/byzantine-mosaic-in-san-vitale-basilica-ravenna-royalty-free-image/175522853?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nimu1956/Collection E+ via Getty images">nimu1956/Collection E+ via Getty images</a></span>
Mosaic in San Vitale Basilica, Ravenna, Italy nimu1956/Collection E+ via Getty images

Cathedrals and chapels have played vital roles in the development of Christian culture.

As a scholar of the Bible, Judaism and Christianity, I have come to learn the historic importance of these structures and the pivotal role they play in the practice of many Christians’ faith.

Early Christian architecture

Cathedrals and chapels not only provide a space for worship, but they are also vessels for the display of religious iconography and art.

Until the early fourth century A.D., much of early Christian art and space for worship occurred in catacombs – subterranean locations where Christians would bury members of their community.

It has traditionally been thought that Christians used such catacombs due to persecutions by the Roman government. However, such persecutions were periodic and not sustained. Other explanations have been offered regarding the regular use of the

Read More

This Netflix Film Eerily Predicted a Real-Life Political Assassination

Netflix
Netflix

“Truth is the most important thing,” says Tomasz (Maciej Musiałowski) midway through The Hater, and of all the falsehoods this habitual liar spews, none is more shameless. Still, while deception is Tomasz’s stock-in-trade, there’s plenty of authenticity to be found in writer/director Jan Komasa’s Netflix feature (premiering July 29), whose release was temporarily delayed because its fictional story wound up echoing a real-life tragedy that shook Komasa’s native Poland.

Three weeks after filming wrapped on The Hater, liberal Gdańsk mayor Paweł Adamowicz was assassinated on stage at a Christmas charity event by a right-wing hatemonger—a shocking crime that eerily echoes the plot of Komasa’s latest, which builds to a similar massacre involving a left-leaning homosexual politician who, by total coincidence, is also named Paweł. That campaigning candidate is not, however, the material’s protagonist; instead, the focus is squarely on Tomasz, a twentysomething student introduced being kicked out

Read More

10 crazy tips for cosplaying San Diego at home, long lines and all

So you can’t go to Comic-Con this week, because the enormous pop culture convention – one of the world’s greatest displays of mask wearing – was canceled by a real-life supervillain, the COVID-19 pandemic.

There’s some consolation for the 135,000 dressed-to-the-(Seven-of)-Nines fans who annually crowd the San Diego Convention Center and millions more who don’t, as a scaled-back lineup of movie, TV and comic panels will stream for free on YouTube through Sunday.

Panels are only a small part of San Diego Comic-Con, as anyone lucky enough to attend – and survive – the annual pageant of costumes, collectibles and queues can attest. [email protected] is trying to re-create parts of the experience, letting fans print out badges and window signs and participate in sidewalk art and cosplay challenges, with some entries to be featured on the Comic-Con website and social media channels.   

Never been to Comic-Con? Here are the can’t-miss

Read More

Lawsuits allege Hilton, other hotels discriminated against Black guests

Albert Law had checked into the Hilton Richmond Downtown in Virginia’s capital and was waiting in the lobby when a security guard approached him with Criminal Defense Lawyer in Chicago a question. It floored him.

“Do you belong here?” the guard inquired, demanding to see his room key and identification. As the only Black person seated near several white people – none of whom were being asked the same question – Law said in an interview he was deeply offended.

“It’s a level of humiliation you can never get out of your head,” said Law, a software executive from the Atlanta suburbs who had come to the hotel for a law-enforcement administrators conference in March 2018.

Law is one of several Black people who have filed lawsuits alleging they were confronted about their presence at hotels where they were visitors or were registered guests. In some instances, hotel staff either

Read More